Super User

Super User

This 14th conference of CITU, being held from 4th to 8th April, 2013 at Kannur, condemns the Water Policy, 2012 of the Government of India directing the state governments to realize water charges on ‘production cost’, privatization through PPP route and to establish independent regulatory authority and, thereby, withdrawing from government’s responsibility of providing water for drinking, household use and agricultural use particularly by the toiling sections.

The UDF government in Kerala decided enactment to corporatize this vital service sector by establishing Kerala Drinking Water Supply Company Ltd with majority private shareholding and bringing entire state under its coverage. Similar steps are being taken in other states also like Delhi Jal Board is being privatized beginning in four areas under slogan of 24/7 supply; Maharashtra government doing the same beginning at Nagpur; Karnataka government in Hubli and Dharwar etc.

People have their basic right on this natural resource for protection of their lives and livelihood which must not be allowed to be used by corporates for business and profits.

The conference calls upon the working class of the country to rise in defending the people’s right on this vital natural resource water.

The 14th Conference of CITU, being held on 4-8 April 2013 in Kannur reiterates its commitment to carry forward and strengthen the work among working women that CITU has started nearly 35 years ago.

The conference notes that CITU has made considerable advances in organising working women since 1979 when it organised the first all India convention of working women in Chennai and constituted the All India Coordination Committee of Working Women. The membership of women in CITU which was less than 7% at that time has gone up to 31.96% in 2011. In several states it is more than 50%. Women’s presence in the mobilisation of CITU, in its day to day activities, in the conferences at the state and national level, in the decision making bodies has also increased since then.

While expressing its satisfaction at this progress, this conference also is conscious that many weaknesses that have been repeatedly pointed out by the successive conventions of the All India Coordination Committee of Working Women (CITU) as well as the successive all India conferences of CITU are yet to be overcome.

The general weakness of unions, particularly in industries where both men and women work like plantations, beedi, brick kiln etc, in raising the specific problems of working women like equal wages, maternity benefits and crèches, sexual harassment etc from the union platform and mobilising both men and women on these issues, still continues. In several states, even where women membership is above the national average, resistance to elect women as delegates to conferences and to the decision making bodies continues. This was evident in many of the recently concluded state conferences also.

Our work among working women is not reviewed in the state committees. Proper attention is not paid to identify, train, develop and promote women cadres. No action is taken by the state committees to ensure formation of women’s sub committees in our unions in sectors with considerable women workers and to see that they function effectively. Holding the state conventions and constituting state level coordination committees is observed as a periodic ritual in some states while in some states even this is not done.

This conference reiterates that our work among working women is part of our objective of uniting the entire working class and mobilising it to play its due role in leading the struggle against all exploitation. It firmly believes that overcoming the weaknesses and improving our work among working women will contribute to strengthening the CITU and trade union movement as a whole. The basic weakness lies in the influence of the class divided patriarchal society along with the lack of consciousness on the urgency of organising and activating working women in leading bodies of CITU at all levels. The CITU as a whole has to make conscious and sustained effort to overcome these weaknesses. The convention of All India Coordination Committee of Working Women, which had to be deferred due to unavoidable reasons and will be held shortly, will also discuss these issues in detail and make the necessary recommendations.
This 14th conference of CITU calls upon all the state committees of CITU, its industrial federations and affiliated units to rededicate to the task of strengthening the work among working women by –

 Discussing our work among working women as a specific agenda in the first state committee meeting immediately after this national conference

 Identifying the affiliated unions in sectors with considerable number of women workers and constitute women’s sub committees, make them functional and take up women’s specific issues from the union platform

 Allot a state office bearer of CITU to monitor the effective implementation of the above at all levels of the organisation

 Organise separate trade union classes for working women activists and develop them to take up more responsibilities in CITU and its affiliated unions

 Pay special attention to recruit women full timers

The Conference resolves to convene a national workshop with the participation of the president/ general secretary of all the state committees of CITU, after the national convention of All India Coordination Committee of Working Women to chalk out further concrete measures to strengthen our work among working women.

Forward to the 14th Conference of CITU at Kannur

Towards Strengthening Unity and Countrywide Struggles!

CITU is getting ready for its 14th Conference, scheduled to be held in Kannur in Kerala on 4 - 8 April 2013. The 13th conference was held in Chandigarh on 17-21 March 2010.

This three year period was a period of great importance in the 43 years existence of CITU, for the organisation as well as for the working people of the country. This was a period when the working class of India has shown its capacity to unitedly fight on the demands of not only the workers but all the working people in the country. This was a period when the country witnessed an unprecedented unity of all the central trade unions and most of the national federations, which came together to fight on a common ten point charter of demands. In many states several regional and independent trade unions too joined in the campaigns and struggles further widening trade union unity.

For CITU, it was a step towards fulfilling the clarion call given at the time of its foundation Conference in May 1970.

Immediately after its formation, CITU started its efforts to turn its slogan ‘Unity and Struggle’, into a reality. These efforts received the support and solidarity of several organisations and resulted in the formation of various joint platforms including the United Council of Trade Unions (UTUC), the National Campaign Committee (NCC), the Sponsoring Committee of Indian Trade Unions and the National Platform of Mass Organisations. The joint movement was further broadened since 2009 achieving total unity of all the central trade unions and national federations.

Almost all these struggles were on issues concerning various sections of working people – for remunerative prices for the peasants, comprehensive law for the agricultural workers, for ensuring employment and unemployment relief to the youth – these were raised by the historic 19th January 1982 strike, the first of its kind in independent India.

From that country wide strike to the recent 48 hours General strike, the Trade Unions in the country have broken many a barriers and its importance and impact has already been noted by various sections.

As the General Secretary of the World Federation of Trade Unions (WFTU) George Mavrikos noted “The successful two day strike has been an important lesson for the international working class and a loud message to the Indian Government”.

It is a fact of the day, that not in many countries we have united actions by the central trade unions affiliated with ITUC, WFTU and those not affiliated with any international organisation. It is also a fact that not many would have even dreamed of a joint platform of all the Central TUs and National Federations in India considering the happenings during the past.

Each and every organisation, now involved in this joint movement has contributed in its own way in making this joint platform and struggles a reality.

For its part, CITU, true to the call from its foundation conference and its class orientation, has made all efforts to discharge its role with the necessary enthusiasm, initiative, commitment and dedication. Every member of CITU can be proud of that role.

Sectoral to National
In fact, the joint activities at various sectoral levels like steel, coal etc and by the CPSTU in the Central PSUs in general, played an important role in unifying the workers. Almost all the major sectors like electricity, transport, banks, insurance, defence production, telecom and government employees, saw united struggles at various levels including country wide sectoral strikes, during the last 30 years.

In the recent period the scheme workers like the anganwadi employees, ASHAs, mid day meal workers and others and the workers in the unorganised sector like beedi etc have also conducted united campaigns and struggles. This period also saw many a united struggles in various states.

These struggles have laid a firm foundation for lower level unity in the joint national struggles.

At the time of the 13th Conference, the present phase of united struggles had begun. The inaugural session of the 13th Conference in Chandigarh, witnessed the reiteration of strengthening united struggles by various central TUs.

Immediately after the Conference, the decision to go for a countrywide strike on a five point charter of demands was taken. The strike on 7th September 2010, incidentally, coincided with the International Day of Action called by WFTU, resulting in strikes and struggles in different parts of the world.

Last 3 years saw two more general strikes – on 28th February 2012 and on 20-21 February 2013. In between, we witnessed the largest mobilisation of workers for a Parliament March on 23rd February 2011 and again another March on 20th December. Large scale demonstrations, dharnas and Jail Bharo were also organised. There were many sectoral strikes also during this period, including few countrywide strike actions.

CITU, carrying forward the decisions of the 13th Conference played an effective role in all these struggles – national, state and at work spot level.

CITU has taken the message of unity and struggle to every nook and corner of the country. The improvement in carrying the message of unity down to grass root level has been noted during the successful 48 hours strike.

Independent movements
CITU unions and federations and also committees at various levels, took up many issues independently and conducted militant strikes and struggles. The struggles for trade union rights especially in MNCs indifferent parts of the country conducted during the last 3 years, are of great importance and notable successes have been attained in this and also on economic demands of those workers. This period also saw democratic rights of the workers and the people in general being trampled by various governments and workers militantly resisting these attacks.

CITU leaders and also workers, both men and women, faced physical attacks from police, goondas, had cases foisted on them and put in jail. There were large scale victimisations in different parts of the country. CITU could fight back effectively in many centres, often with the solidarity and support of fraternal trade unions and mass organisations. Many a local struggles, in organised, unorganised sectors and by the scheme workers were conducted in different states.

The country wide one day strike by construction workers led by CWFI in November 2012 was an important struggle in the unorganised sector. The two days’ mahapadav of the scheme workers organised by CITU, in New Delhi in November 2012, witnessed massive mobilisation, especially of women workers, creating more confidence and fighting spirit not only among the participants but also among the CITU movement as a whole.

International Tasks
It was during this period that CITU got formally affiliated to WFTU and has also taken up certain organisational responsibilities.

CITU’s tradition of upholding the banner of international solidarity is being carried forward, despite many a limitations and difficulties.

Critical period
The period after the last Conference was also politically critical to the working people. Chandigarh Conference was within a year of the 2009 general elections, in which the Left parties faced a set back. In the assembly elections, Left lost both West Bengal and Kerala. We saw a belligerent UPA II going ahead with its neo-liberal agenda and the main opposition party, BJP, generally supporting the Government on these policy matters. Almost all the state governments, though led by different political parties of national and regional status, also followed these disastrous policies.

West Bengal witnessed murderous attacks on the trade unions and on the cadres and leaders of the left and democratic movement. The effect of so called `paribortan’ is new being experienced by everybody with the whole democratic system under attack.

It was in such a critical situation, that the trade unions could successfully build up a united movement, challenging the neo-liberal policies and demanding a change in these policies towards an alternative set of policies. Trade Unions could put the policy issues and also the peoples’ demands on focus.

The unprecedented mobilisation of various sections of people protesting against corruption, attacks on women etc., and demanding justice to various sections are notable developments. Added to these are the impact of the 48 hours general strike, which received massive support of ordinary people in urban and rural centres.

All these are the reflections of the urge among masses for a change. These have to be properly channelised into a mass movement and it is here, the Trade Unions should play a leading role.

All these mobilisations, mass movements and successes attained in various struggles and also the victory of the left front in Tripura, leading to the formation of the seventh LF government form the background of the ensuing 14th Conference.

All these are happening at a time, when the capitalist system is engulfed in an unprecedented crisis. This was noted in the Chandigarh Conference and the crisis has further deepened after that.

The working class, all over the world, in all the continents is on the move, struggling against the denial of even its existing rights and benefits resulting in serious attacks on livelihood of the working people. The increasing disparities all over the world resulted in the now famous slogan `99 percent Vs One percent!’

Despite the severe attacks and serious problems even in day to day functioning of trade unions in many parts of West Bengal, CITU has improved its over all strength after the last Conference. Though there are many a weaknesses still persisting in different areas, CITU is marching ahead.

The Kannur Conference will be discussing all the issues of importance to the working people of the country and also going into various aspects of organisational growth of CITU. This conference will pave the way for further strengthening the united activities and struggles of working class and also other sections of toiling masses!

A.K. Padmanabhan

Sunday, 09 February 2014 18:06

History of CITU Conferences

Preparations have already begun in Kannur, Kerala for the 14th All India Conference of CITU, to be held from 4th to 8th April 2013. On this occasion, let us have a brief look at all the previous conferences.

Foundation Conference
The All India Trade Union Conference was held from 28th to 30th May, as per the decision of a Convention of General Council members and State Committee members of AITUC, held at Goa on 9th and 10th April 1970. It was held at Lenin Nagar (Ranji Stadium) in Kolkata. A reception committee with Com. Jyoti Basu as Chairman and Com. Manoranjan Roy as General Secretary organized the conference. Reception Committee had enrolled 50,000 workers as members of the committee. The review made later noted that the enthusiasm among workers for this conference was such that, when a call was made for collection of Rs.2 lakhs, 3 lakhs was collected within a short period of 3 weeks! The Conference was attended by 4264 delegates representing 1759 unions with a membership of 8,04,637/- from 18 states. Fraternal unions sent 116 delegates and 1134 observers attended the conference, making a total of 5514 participants. The Conference was guided by a presidium consisting of Mohammed Ismail, Suhrid Mullick Chaudhury, Haridas Malakar, E. Balanandan, Bimalanada Mukherji, A Balasubramaniam and S.Y. Kolhatkar. P. Ramamurti presented the report, which was earlier circulated in English, Hindi, Bengali, Urdu, Tamil and Malayalam. There were brief translation of all speeches in all languages for the delegates. The resolution on formation of a new All India Trade Union Centre, to be named Centre of Indian Trade Unions (CITU) was moved in the Conference on 30th May, by Com.Manoranjan Roy (West Bengal) and seconded by E. Balanandan (Kerala); which was passed unanimously among thunderous applause and shouting of slogans.

The Conference elected B.T. Ranadive as President, P. Ramamurti as General Secretary and Kamal Sarkar as Treasurer. Mohammed Ismail, S.Y. Kolhatkar, E. Balanandan, Suhrid Mallick Chaudhari and Sudhin Kumar were elected Vice-Presidents and M.K. Pandhe, Manoranjan Roy and Niren Ghosh as Secretaries. The Conference elected 158 General Council members and 33 working committee members were elected by the General Council. The Working Committee included Coms. Jyoti Basu and Samar Mukherji. On 31st May, a massive rally of 10 lakhs of workers was held in the Brigade Parade Ground.

Second Conference
Second All India Conference was held in Ernakulam, in Kerala from 18th to 22nd April 1973. Meeting after 3 years of the foundation conference and at the time of serious political developments in the country, this was an important conference in our history. Com. B.T. Ranadive, in his presidential address referred to the massive arrests of Comrades who were put behind bars under MISA and to the monstrous repression in West Bengal and also in other states. General Secretary’s report, presented by Com. P.Ramamurti gave details about all these attacks and the struggles being conducted by our unions, defending the rights of working people. The Conference reelected Com. BTR and PR as President and General Secretary. Com. Jyoti Basu was elected as one of the Seven Vice Presidents. Samar Mukherjee was elected Treasurer. The conference concluded with a massive rally on 22nd April.

Third Conference at Mumbai
Third Conference was held in Mumbai, from 21st to 25th May 1975. Com. B.T.R, began his Presidential Address, greeting to people of Vietnam and Cambodia, for their epochal victories against US imperialism. He also referred to the continuous struggles conducted by the Indian Working class. Among others, he noted that “on an average more than a million and half are engaged in strike action since 1966, a whole decade.”

In his concluding address, Com. BTR, referred in detail to the points raised in the discussions, increasing attacks on working class and pointed out that more and more attacks, including those on our democratic rights are in the offing. He thundered, “We stand by class struggle, we have got a conception of class struggle, we have got a conception of worker-peasant alliance. Anything which deviates from this, will not take us to the goal of revolution”. He also pointed out that “inspite of immediate difficulties, we are entering a period of tremendous opportunities”. The Conference reelected Coms. BTR and PR as President and General Secretary and Manoranjan Roy was elected Treasurer. Coms. Samar Mukherjee and Nrisingha Chakraborty were among the six Secretaries.

Chennai Conference
The Fourth Conference was held at Chennai, from 11 to 15 April 1979. The period between the third and fourth Conference was a period of critical importance to the Indian democratic movement. Within a month of 3rd Conference, Emergency was declared and denial of democratic rights was complete. The authoritarian Govt., led by Indira Gandhi, violated all democratic norms but could not continue in power. 1977 elections to the Lok Sabha, brought to power a Janata Party Govt. the first non-Congress Govt. at centre. Later, in West Bengal Assembly elections, the first Left Govt. was voted to power and Com. Jyoti Basu became the Chief Minister. In 1978, Tripura also voted for a left front government.

The united struggle involving all Central Trade Unions against the Industrial Relations Bill in 1978 was a new phase of united trade union movement.
It was in this fourth conference, a separate meeting of working women was held and the All India Co-ordination Committee of working women was formed with Comrade Vimala Ranadive as Convener. Coms. BTR and PR were reelected as President and General Secretary and Samar Mukherjee was elected Treasurer. Com. Sushila Gopalan was one of the nine Vice-Presidents and was the first woman in the CITU secretariat.

Kanpur Conference
The Fifth Conference of CITU was held in Kanpur, the historic industrial centre of many struggles in the pre independent India; from 13 to 17 April 1983. This Conference coincided with the death centenary year of Karl Marx and the Conference called upon the delegates to assimilate his teachings and carry forward the message to the grass roots level to expose conspiracies of imperialism led by USA.

Among the foreign delegates in the Conference were those from Soviet Union and Peoples Republic of China. Among those greeted the conference was Com. Indrajit Gupta, General Secretary AITUC and O.P. Aghi Secretary BMS. On behalf of All India KisanSabha, Com. Harkishan Sigh Surjeet greeted the Conference. 2196 delegates including 57 women, 43 observers and 16 fraternal delegates attended the conference. 1069 delegates had been to jail. Com. BTR was reelected as President and Samar Mukherjee was the new General Secretary. Com. PR was one of the eleven Vice Presidents. Com.E. Balanandan was elected as Treasurer. Totally there were 20 secretariat members.

Com. BTR in his concluding address referred to the increasing lockouts and called upon the delegates “to convert the anti lock-out struggles into democratic struggles against this anti-social Act of employers”. Referring to the formation of National Campaign Committee and the country wide general strike on 19th January 1982, he said that the consciousness about unity and united struggles is growing and that is a welcome feature.

Sixth Conference at Mumbai
The Sixth Conference was held in Mumbai, 18-22 May 1987. This was the second time Mumbai was hosting the Conference. The period after the fifth conference was a period of rapid changes in our country and the world. The conference noted that because of persistent efforts and overcoming many obstacles, the struggle for trade union unity has been successful and this unity has been strengthened. It was also noted that inspite of various endeavours, “United strength of working class has not succeeded in stunning the tide of economic offensive”.

The period after fifth conference was a period of fight against communal, divisive and disruptive forces and CITU committees and unions have been in the forefront of struggle against these forces. This conference reiterated the clarion call for formation of a “Confederation of Central Trade Unions, and national federations, where all issues concerning labour and economic policy can be discussed freely and decisions taken unanimously”. A full day session on issues of working women was held.

Com. Jyoti Basu, third time Chief Minister of West Bengal and Vice-President, addressed the conference, exhorting the delegates to be more organized, united and politically conscious, against the policies of Central Government, which were increasingly directed against the working class. He explained the relation between left front government in West Bengal and the working class, Com. Jyoti Basu, said that the Govt. has called upon the employers to meet genuine demands of workers, otherwise workers will be compelled to resort to agitation and strikes.

Com. B.T. Ranadive, Samar Mukherjee and E. Balanandan were reelected as President, General Secretary and Treasurer. Out of the total 26 Secretariat members, there were 3 women – Sushila Gopalan, Ahalya Rangnekar and Vimala Ranadive. The Conference venue at Mumbai was named after Com. V.P. Chintan a senior leder of CITU from Tamilnadu. He died in Moscow on 8th May, where he had gone on behalf of CITU to attend May Day celebrations. 2366 delegates and 80 observers attended the conference among them 134 were women. 1114 comrades were attending the conference for first time and 209 had attended all the five previous conference.

Seventh Conference
Calcutta hosted the Seventh Conference, from 13 to 17 February 1991. This was the second time the Conference was being held there, the first being the foundation conference. 21 years after the foundation conference, the working class was facing new challenges. This was the first time, CITU was holding its conference without Coms. BTR and PR amongst the delegates. Com. Jyoti Basu presided over the inaugural session. The Conference noted the increase in membership despite increasing closures. Com. Samar Mukherjee stressed the need for collective and democratic functioning at all levels.

Com. Jyoti Basu, in his concluding speech, referred to the dangerous growth of communal and divisive forces and called upon the working class, to defeat and isolate them. He laid stress on bringing the workers in the unorganized sector into the fold of trade union actions. The Conference elected Coms. E. Balanandan and M.K. Pandhe as President and General Secretary. Both of them were members of the Secretariat from the foundation conference. Ranjit Basu was the new treasurer. The Conference concluded with a mass rally at Brigade Parade Ground on 17th. CITU membership crossed 20 lakhs by the time of this conference. 2341 delegates and 121 observers attended the conference. There were 121 women participants in the conference.

Working Womens Convention
A separate convention of working women was held prior to the conference, on 12th and 13th February, attended by 475 delegates from 18 states. This was the new beginning of having separate convention of working women at national level after the separate sessions in conference, which stated in 4th Conference in 1979.

Patna Conference
The Eighth Conference was held in Patna, from 3 to 7 March 1994. The clarion call of the Conference was to further strengthen the united movement of Trade Unions and also to strengthen the united movements with other mass organizations. Stepping up the actions against the IMF prescribed policies of the Narasimha Rao Govt. was the need of the hour. This was the message from the conference. Presided by Com. E. Balanandan, the conference was inaugurated by Com.Jyoti Basu, Vice-President and Chief Minister of West Bengal. The mass rally was held in the afternoon.

Nine Commissions were formed to discuss various important issues. Conference held detailed discussions on the new economic policies.
In his concluding address Com. E. Balanandan pointed out that “Unity of the T.U. movement to-day is reflected not only for defending the rights of the working class but for defending the unity and integrity of the country and its sovereignty. The fight against all round offensive by imperialism is therefore to be further strengthened and given shape of mass actions”. Com. E. Balanandan and M.K. Pandhe were reelected President and General Secretary. Com. Saroj Choudhary was elected Treasurer. There were 16 Vice-president and 20 Secretaries. 2031 delegates from 21 States including 133 women attended the Conference.

Ninth Conference
Kochi hosted the CITU Conference for the second time from 21-26 April 1997. “Towards big battles against Globalisation and Liberalisation” was the call of the ninth conference. Building up the unity of the working class was stressed in the sessions of the conference. A Seminar on T.U. unity in the struggle against the New Economic Policy was held which was addressed by leaders of other Central TUs including A.B. Bardhan (AITUC). AITUC and HMS proposed immediate merger of central TUs in the seminar. CITU emphasized the need of formation of a confederation of all central T.Us, which would further pave the way for formation of a singe national T.U. centre in the country. There were six commissions, discussing various important subjects. On 20th April, fifth Convention of working women was held. 307 delegates from 17 states attended.

Com. E.K. Nayanar, Chief Minister of Kerala, addressed the Delegate Session and the public rally. 2409 delegates attended the conference. 178 were women. E. Balanandan, M.K. Pandhe and Ranjit Basu were elected President, General Secretary and Treasurer. Total Secretariat members were 36.

Tenth Conference
Andhra Pradesh hosted the tenth conference, which was held in Hyderabad from 27-30 December 2000. Com. Balanandan in his presidential address dealt with various struggles at the international level and noted developing resistance to U.S. imperialism. The conference discussion referred to the return of N.D.A. to power in 1999 and their efforts to dismantling PSUs and other actions in the name of second generation reforms. It also noted that there have been umpteen number of struggles by various sections of workers. Developing a powerful mass movement was the need of the hour. That was the understanding that arose from the discussions.

Conference discussed 7 important issues in commissions. This conference also had a separate discussion on organization. A call for an All India protest day was given to be observed on 24th January 2001. Prior to the conference, on 16-17 September, Sixth All India Convention of working women was held in Haldia and a resolution on tasks on working womens front was adopted in the conference. 2542 delegates attended the conference which included 262 women. E. Balanandan, M.K. Pandhe and Ranjit Basu were reelected President, General Secretary and Treasurer. In total there were 35 members in the Secretariat.

Chennai Conference
Chennai hosted the All India Conference for the second time, from 9 to 14 December 2003. This was the Eleventh Conference.
The Conference had detailed discussions on the situation nationally and also at international level. This was in the background of the policies of NDA Govt. and the increasing attacks on the working people. The recommendations of the Second National Commission on labour, had sought to take away whatever protection workers had enjoyed due to incessant struggles. In spite of opposition from the democratic sections, Govt. had enacted the draconian POTA.

The conference had a full session on the tasks among working women. The conference had six separate commissions to discuss important issues.
The new secretariat had 35 members. Com. M.K. Pandhe and Chittabrata Majumdar were elected President and General Secretary. Ranjit Basu was reelected Treasurer. Com. E. Balanandan was elected as one of the ten Vice-Presidents. Coms. Samar Mukherjee, C. Kannan and R. Umanath had opted to be relieved from their responsibilities. Com. E. Balanandan, in his concluding address paid glowing tributes to these comrades. Number of women comrades in the Secretariat increased to 4 in this conference. The Conference concluded with a massive procession and rally. Budhadeb Bhattacharya, Chief Minister of West Bengal was the main speaker in the rally.

Bangalore Conference
Bangalore hosted the Twelfth Conference of CITU from 17 to 21 January 2007. Five jathas from Amritsar, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai and Thiruvananthapuram were organized as a run up to the conference and were received at the conference venue on 17th morning. Com. Pandhe, in his Presidential addressed dealt in detail, the developments in the international arena.

General Secretary Com. Chittabrata Majumdar, dealt with the onslaught on labour in detail. He referred to the second generation reforms of UPA Govt. and noted that the main pillars of these reforms have been total liberalization of financial sector, complete overhauling of labour laws aimed at casualisation and contractorisation of the labour force and complete liberalization and deregulation of trade. This was a period when we had 3 all India strikes in all the three preceding years; 24th February 2004, 29th September 2005 and 14th December 2006.

This conference gave a call for observance of birth centenary of Com. P. Ramamurti from 20th September 2007; for one year and for establishment of a Trade Union School in the name of Com. P. Ramamurti. 2439 delegates including 297 women attended the conference. There were 55 fraternal delegates from different parts of the world. Com. M.K. Pandhe, Chittabrata Majumdar and Rajit Basu were reelected President, General Secretary and Treasurer. Com. Chittabrata Majumdar passed away immediately after the conference and Mohammed Amin was elected General Secretary in February 2007.

Chandigarh Conference
The 13th Conference, was held in Chandigarh from 17 to 21 March 2010. This conference was being held after the General election in 2009 and UPAII had come to power. In the background of the political situation, this conference pointed out the challenges ahead as well as opportunities.

The United Trade Union movement has got further strengthened with all Central Trade Unions had come together to struggle for a common charter of demand. The inaugural session of the Chandigarh conference reflected this with leaders of all central trade unions being present there to declare united struggles in the coming period. The venue was named after Com. Jyoti Basu, our veteran leader and Vice-President from the Second Conference. In between we had also lost Comrades Balanandan, Chittabrata Majumdar and Ranjit Basu. Conference was attended by George Mavrikose General Secretary of CITU. 2410 delegates including 357 women from 24 states attended this conference; representing 50,50,942 members.

The Conference had discussed six important subjects in commissions. A.K. Padmanabhan, Tapan Sen and Ranjana Nirula were elected as the new President, General Secretary and Treasurer. Six women comrades were elected to the secretariat. The Conference concluded with a well attended mass rally.

Sunday, 09 February 2014 16:26

Weblinks

Sunday, 09 February 2014 16:25

Committee of Public Sector Trade Unions

The emergence and sustenance of united trade movement of the Central Public Sector Undertakings (CPSU) Workers in India has a very long history. The very beginning can be traced in the joint convention of the CPSU workers held at Hyderabad on 23-24 December 1977. That period has been significant for the reason that a new political situation emerged in the country with defeat at the hustings the most atrocious avowedly anti-worker authoritarian ‘Internal Emergency’ (June 1975 to November 1977) regime of Indira Gandhi and the Janata Party Government came to power at the centre. Although CPSTU formally came into existence a few years later, actually this convention laid the foundation stone for the CPSTU.

The period since the Hyderabad convention, the country witnessed regular hectic activities of the Central Public Sector Undertakings (CPSU) workers jointly organised by CITU, AITUC, HMS, BMS and the two Apex Forums of CPSU workers at Bangalore and Hyderabad. The struggles took place at industry, regional and national levels.

The major issues of the period concerning which the struggles took place were against wage freeze steps of the Government, against anti-worker unilateral guidelines issued by Bureau of Public Enterprises (BPE) directed at curbing the right to collective bargaining, against fraud in compilation of Consumer Price Index (CPI) and proper fixation of rate of Dearness Allowance, Bonus to all workers etc etc. The other most important issue of the same period was the fight against atrocious Industrial Relations Bill designed to take away the trade union rights of the workers, opposition to Compulsory Deposit Scheme (CDS) etc.

The CITU has been taking very seriously the joint movement of the CPSU workers right from the inception. The organisational strength of CITU amongst the CPSU workers all over the country since then has been growing rapidly. Rajib Gandhi Government, in the mid-eighties, took concrete steps to ideologically and financially weaken public sector in the country. The ground work was done by the infamous Arjun Sengupta Committee Report which recommended taking away the workers collective bargaining rights among other steps. CITU took initiative to defeat this design and unify the public sector workers against such moves.

A related important development of the period was a convention of the CPSU trade the unions affiliated to CITU and also the unions friendly to CITU was held at Bangalore on 27-28 May 1985 which was attended by 284 delegates representing 84 trade unions from different CPSU workers. Reporting about the convention it was noted that, “the Bangalore convention has been a turning point in the PSU trade union movement. This initiative of CITU paved the way for consolidating the unity of PSU workers and ultimately the CPSTU came into being.”

Amidst the aforesaid on going struggles of the CPSU workers a joint national convention took place at New Delhi on 21-22 October 1986. Around 300 trade unions and 50 National Federations of the CPSU workers represented by over 800 delegates participated in the convention. A 14-point Charter of Demands (CoD) was adopted in the convention. The programmes to press for the CoD finalised in the convention included a nationwide strike on 21st January 1987. The convention expressed its firm resolve to fight the policy of demolition and privatisation of CPSUs initiated by the then Rajiv Gandhi Government.

The other historic decision of the same convention was the formation of Committee of Public Sector Trade Unions (CPSTU). The founding constituents of the CPSTU were CITU, AITUC, HMS, BMS, Joint Action Front (JAF), Bangalore and Co-ordination Committee of Public Sector Trade Unions, Hyderabad.

As a sequel to the demolition of Babri Masjid and accompanied communal holocaust in the country designed and executed by the ‘Sangh Parivar’ in 1992 the BMS got separated from the CPSTU.
CPSTU took formal shape of a united platform of the major segment of the trade union movement in the country including the core and strategic sectors through a long drawn phase of united struggles of the CPSU workers. It has truly emerged from the thick of struggles. CPSTU is the concrete manifestation of the concept of Unity and Struggle. In fact CPSTU is the longest ever united forum of trade unions continuing its active existence in the country. No other joint initiative or forums of trade unions in the country existed for such a long period. At the peak of its activities the CPSTU had really represented around 20 lakhs (2 million) workers spread over around 200 CPSU in the country.

The contributions of CPSTU strengthening the trade union movement in the country have been huge in dimension and basic in character. The activities of CPSTU contributed in broadening the functioning frame work of the major industrial sector trade union movement from the confine of factory level to industry-wise national level. The major industry-wise national federations really derived strength from the activities of CPSTU. At the instance of CPSTU the industry-wise national level joint activities of trade unions in different industrial sectors got a big boost. Thus the working class movement of the country switched over from local level consciousness to national level consciousness as a consequence of the emergence of CPSTU.

Yet another major area in which the contribution of the CPSTU must be counted the most is the realisation of PSU-wise apex level collective bargaining system. This achievement of the CPSTU has made significant contributions in many ways in our trade union movement. One of the basic rights of the workers i.e., Right to Collective Bargaining got institutionalised for the workers of the CPSUs covering the almost all the major industrial sectors in the country. This has also shown the way to others.

Over the period the compensation package of the CPSU workers achieved the height of setting standard in the country. This has been possible entirely due to the united strength and struggles of the around 20 lakh PSU workers engineered by the CPSTU. Before the surfacing of the collective agreements of the CPSU workers the situation was pitiable. But it is important to understand and remember that but for leadership provided by CPSTU in fighting the policies of the Government in restricting the right to collective bargaining and achieving quality compensation package it would not have been possible to achieve by the individual industries or CPSUs as it is before us today. These are of course, apart from the contribution of CPSTU in the general trade union movement of the country in fighting the anti-worker policies initiated by the ruling classes from time to time.

And with the introduction of the World Bank and IMF prescribed economic policies by the Congress party Government in July 1991 and pushed with added degree of onslaught by the every successive Government at the centre focusing all round attack on public sector, the fight to protect public sector became the most urgent issue before the CPSU workers in particular and CPSTU unfailingly played its historical role. Before 1991, the period preceding to the introduction of the disastrous Fund-Bank dictated economic policies, the CPSU workers conducted many long drawn battles including many strike struggles for the cause of public sector industries and its workers. These struggles were led by CPSTU. However in the current onslaught against public sector since 1991, the struggles has attained new dimension necessitating broader level of intervention of the patriotic democratic movement of the country and the CPSTU is a front ranking constituent of these struggles.

However, CPSTU is really the source of inspiration and symbol of struggles for the CPSU workers in the country. Presently the top most priority task before the CPSU workers is to protect the public sector from the liquidating onslaught of the policies of liberalisation and privatisation. At the same time the urgent economic issues pertaining to the current round of collective bargaining for the 7th round of wage negotiations is also important. CPSTU is definitely destined to discharge its historical responsibilities in this respect.

Sunday, 09 February 2014 16:00

State Committees - Contact Details

achat cialis ligne france en Hyres, cialis acheter sans ordonnance

Andaman & Nicobar Islands

Crusade House
Phoenix Bay
Port Blair - 744 102
Andaman and Nicobar Islands 
Tel: 03192 - 233513
Fax: 03192 - 235747

Andhra Pradesh

N V B S Kendram
1-7-139/44, S R K Nagar
Risalagadda, Jamistanpur
Musheerabad
Hyderabad - 500 048
Tel: 040 - 24612474
Fax: 040 - 27646565

Assam

Anand Ram Barua Raod
Near Srimant Press
Guwahati - 781 001
Telefax: 0361 - 2542650
Fax: 0361 - 2737302
0361 - 2734771

Bihar

14, President Chamber
Birchand Patel Marg
Patna - 800 01

Chhattishgarh

\\\"PRABHANJALI\\\"
33, R.D.A. Colony
Tikrapara, Raipur
Chhattisgarh - 492 001
Tel: 0771 - 4020916

Delhi

3, V P House
Rafi Marg
New Delhi - 110 001
Tel: 011 - 23714543

Goa

P.O Box No - 90
Vasco-Da-Gama
Goa - 408 002

Gujarat

Prathana Samaj
Raykhad
Ahmedabad - 079 - 25352764

Haryana

Sahid Jasbir Smarak
Shilabhai
Rohtak - 124 001
Tel: 01262 - 296900
Fax: 01262 - 266901

Himachal

Room No. 9
Bawa 
Hotel
Simla - 171 003
Tel: 0177 - 2653019
Fax: 0177 - 2808119

Jharkhand

Viswakarma Mandir Lane
Opp. Wool House
Main Road
Ranchi - 834 001
Telefax: 0651 - 2331625

Jammu and Kashmir

27/A, Government Quarters
Gandhi Nagar
Jammu (Tawi)

Karnataka

SURI BHAVAN, No 40/5, 2nd B Main 
16th Cross,Sampangiramnagar 
Bangalore -560027
Tel: 080 - 22111307
Fax: 080 - 22111239
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kerala

Melethampanoor
Thiruvanthapuran
Kerala - 695 001
Tel: 0471 - 2331811
Fax: 0471 - 2238311

Madhya Pradesh

13/B, Padmanbh Nagar
New Subhash Nagar Colony
Bhopal - 462 023
Tel: 0755 - 2757751
Fax: 0755 - 2759532

Maharashtra

\\\'Janashakti\\\'
P.B Marg
Worli
Mumbai - 400 013
Tel: 022 - 24926841, 24951576
Fax: 022 - 24961525

Orissa

VR-5/1, Kharavelnagar
Unit - III
Bhubaneswar - 751 001
Telefax: 0674 - 2395410
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Punjab

Cheema Bhawan
Sector - 30 B
Chandigarh
Tel: 0172 - 2657936
Fax: 0172 - 2654055

Rajasthan

Shramik Ekta Kendra
SD-137, Shanti Nagar
Jaipur - 302 006

Sikkim

The President
Yuksom Breweries Labour Association
P.O. - Melli-Bajar
South Sikkim - 737 128

Tamil Nadu

A Nallasivam Ninaivagam
13, Mosque Street
Chepauk
Chennai - 600 005
Tel: 044 - 28410259
Fax: 044 - 28511975

Tripura

28 Office Lane
P.O Agartala - 799 001
Tel: 0381 - 2324255
Fax: 0381 - 2319259
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Uttar Pradesh

10, Vidhan Sabha Marg
Lucknow - 226 01
Tel: 0522 - 2610459
Fax: 0522 - 2614736

Uttaranchal

Parade Ground
Near Survey Chowk
Dehradun - 248 001
Tel: 0135 - 2654397
Fax: 0135 - 2652572

West Bengal

Shramik Bhavan
53 A J C Bose Road
Kolkata - 700 016
Tel: 033 - 22265377, 22277155
Fax: 033 - 22266670

Sunday, 09 February 2014 13:58

ALL INDIA OFFICE BEARERS

OFFICE BEARERS ELECTED IN THE 16TH CONFERENCE OF CITU
23- 27 January 2020, Chennai, Tamil Nadu

PRESIDENT: K HEMALATA
GENERAL SECRETARY: TAPAN SEN
TREASURER: M L MALKOTIA

VICE PRESIDENTS SECRETARIES
A K PADMANABHAN S DEVROYE
J S MAJUMDAR ELAMARAM KARIM
A SOUNDARARAJAN KASHMIR SINGH THAKUR
K O HABEEB PRASANTA NANDI CHOWDHURY
K K DIVAKARAN G SUKUMARAN
ANATHALAVATTOM ANANDAN P NANDAKUMAR
MERCYKUTTY AMMA M A GAFOOR
MANIK DEY D D RAMANANDAN
MALATHI CHITTIBABU A R SINDHU
RAGHUNATH SINGH K CHANDRAN PILLAI
BISHNU MAHANTY MEENAKSHISUNDARAM
S VARALAXMI USHA RANI
D L KARAD ANADI SAHU
BABY RANI CHUKKA RAMULU
M SAIBABU MADHUMITA BANDOPADHYAYA
SUBHASH MUKHERJEE AMITAVA GUHA
  R KARUMALAIYAN
  TAPAN SHARMA
  PRAMOD PRADHAN
  VACANT

 

PERMANENT INVITEE:  BASUDEV ACHARYA

Sunday, 09 February 2014 13:48

General Council

CENTRE OF INDIAN TRADE UNIONS (CITU)
GENERAL COUNCIL ELECTED BY THE 16TH CONFERENCE OF CITU
on 23-27 Jan. 2020 Chennai - Tamilnadu

 ANDAMAN (GC-01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
1 1 B CHANDRA CHOODAN  
       
 ANDHRA PRADESH (GC-36)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
2 1 CH. NARSINGA RAO  
3 2 V. UMA MAESWARARAO  
4 3 P. AJAYA KUMAR  
5 4 K. SWARUPA RANI F
6 5 A.V. NAGESWARARAO  
7 6 K. DHANALAXMI F
8 7 K. UMA MAHESWARARAO  
9 8 K. SUBBARAVAMMA F
10 9 M. JAGGUNAIDU  
11 10 R.V. NARSIMHARAO  
12 11 NCH SRINIVAS  
13 12 M. BALAKASI  
14 13 GOUSE DESAI  
15 14 K. MURALI  
16 15 D.N.V.D. PRASAO  
17 16 MUZAFFAR AHAMED  
18 17 AJAY KUMAR K.  
19 18 D. GOVINDA RAO  
20 19 J. AYODHYA RAMU  
21 20 RAJARAMA MOHAN ROY K.  
22 21 Y. NARSIMHARAO  
23 22 K. NAGESWARARAO  
24 23 CHIKATI SRINIVASARAO  
25 24 CH. SUNDARAYYA  
26 25 CH. NAGA BRAHMACHARI  
27 26 T.V. RAMANA  
28 27 NCH. SUPRAJA F
29 28 KOTESWAPARAO   
30 29 CH. RAJKUMAR  
31 30 A. NAGARAJU  
32 31 P. CHAITANYA  
33 32 S. VANISRI  F
34 33 P. MANI F
35 34 P. NIRMALA F
36 35 SRINIVASULU D.  
37 36 B. MANOHAR   
 ASSAM (GC-08)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
38 1 ASHIT DUTTA  
39 2 VACANT  
40 3 MADAN TALUKDAR  
41 4 BIREN SARMA  
42 5 INDIRA NEWAR F
43 6 RAHUL PURKAYASTHA  
44 7 ROYAL SORENG  
45 8 MAHAFFAR ALI  
 BIHAR (GC-04)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
46 1 GANESH SHANKAR SINGH  
47 2 DIPAK BHATTACHARYA  
48 3 RAJ KUMAR JHA  
49 4 ANUPAM KUMAR  
 CHHATTISGARH (GC-01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
50 1 MANAS KUMAR NANDY  
 DELHI (GC-02)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
51 1 ANURAG SAXENA  
52 2 Virender Kumar Gaur  
 GUJARAT (GC-01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
53 1 ARUN MEHTA  
 HARYANA (GC-07)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
54 1 SUREKHA  F
55 2 JAI BHAGWAN  
56 3 SUKHBIR SINGH  
57 4 VINOD KUMAR  
58 5 SATBIR SINGH  
59 6 ANAND SHARMA  
60 7 DESH RAJ  
 HIMACHAL PRADESH (GC-03)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
61 1 PREM GAUTAM  
62 2 VIJENDRA MEHRA  
63 3 NEELAM JASWAL F
 J&K (GC-01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
64 1 OM PRAKASH   
 JHARKHAND (GC-05)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
65 1 MITHILESH KUMAR SINGH  
66 2 PRAKASH VIPLAV  
67 3 RP SINGH  
68 4 FAGU BESRA  
69 5 BISWAJIT DEB  
 KARNATAKA (GC-17)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
70 1 KN UMESH  
71 2 VASHANTHACHARI  
72 3 SYED MUJEEB  
73 4 K. MAHANTESHA  
74 5 SUNANDA HS F
75 6 K. SHANKAR  
76 7 VEERASWAMY  
77 8 MANTANA GOWDA  
78 9 SHANTHA K GOWDA F
79 10 YAMUNA GAONKAR F
80 11 BALAKRISHNA SHETTY J  
81 12 SUNIL KUMAR BAJAL  
82 13 RS BASAVARAJU  
83 14 MALINI MESTHA F
84 15 MAHESH PATHAR  
85 16 PRATAP SIMHA N  
86 17 PARAMESHWARA PK  
 KERALA (GC-158)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
87 1 V.SIVAN KUTTY  
88 2 KATTAKKADA SASI  
89 3 C.JAYAN BABU  
90 4 V.K.MADHU  
91 5 KADAKAMPALLI SURENDRAN  
92 6 E G MOHANAN  
93 7 K S SUNIL KUMAR  
94 8 R.RAMU  
95 9 K C KRISHNAN KUTTY  
96 10 PULLUVILA STANLEY  
97 11 ADV.N.SAIKUMAR  
98 12 MANNARAM RAMACHANDRAN  
99 13 A.SAMPATH  
100 14 D.LATHIKA F
101 15 PUSHPALATHA F
102 16 P.RAJENDRA KUMAR  
103 17 V.KESAVAN KUTTY  
104 18 CLINUS ROSARIO  
105 19 N.PADMALOCHANAN  
106 20 S.JAYAMOHAN  
107 21 B.THULASEEDHARA KURUP  
108 22 P.SAJI  
109 23 MADANTHAKODE MURALI  
110 24 ADV.V.RAVINDRAN NAIR  
111 25 K P KURUP  
112 26 P R VASANTHAN  
113 27 A M IQBAL  
114 28 K.SUBHAGAN  
115 29 N.BEEMA BEEVI F
116 30 L.GEETHA F
117 31 A.ANIRUDHAN  
118 32 KARINGANNUR MURALI  
119 33 T.R.SANKARA PILLAI  
120 34 M.Y.ANTONY  
121 35 T.MANOHARAN  
122 36 S.SUDEVAN  
123 37 P J AJAYAKUMAR  
124 38 K C RAJAGOPALAN  
125 39 S.HARIDAS  
126 40  L LALITHA F
127 41 R.UNNIKRISHNA PILLAI  
128 42 R.SANALKUMAR  
129 43 P P CHITHARANJAN  
130 44 P.GANAKUMAR  
131 45 C B CHANDRABABU  
132 46 C S SUJATHA F
133 47 R.NASAR  
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
134 48 H.SALAM  
135 49 K PRASAD  
136 50 V S MONY  
137 51 M.SURENDRAN  
138 52 A.MAHENDRAN  
139 53 K J THOMAS  
140 54 V N VASAVAN  
141 55 T R RAGHUNATHAN  
142 56 A V RUSSEL  
143 57 K B REMA F
144 58 K K GANESAN  
145 59 ADV.REJI SAKHARIA  
146 60 K P MARY F
147 61 K K JAYACHANDRAN  
148 62 K S MOHANAN  
149 63 K V SASI  
150 64 P S RAJAN  
151 65 R.THILAKAN  
152 66 V N MOHANAN  
153 67 K N GOPINATH  
154 68 C K MANISANKAR  
155 69 P R MURALIDHARAN  
156 70 C K PAREETH  
157 71 DEEPA K.RAJAN F
158 72 C N MOHANAN  
159 73 S.SARMA  
160 74 K A CHACKOCHAN  
161 75 ADV.M . ANIL KUMAR  
162 76 K V MANOJ  
163 77 C D NANDAKUMAR  
164 78 M M VARGHESE  
165 79 U P JOSEPH  
166 80 K K RAMACHANDRAN  
167 81 K F DAVIS  
168 82 K V HARIDAS  
169 83 BABU M PALISSERY  
170 84 R V. IQBAL  
171 85 K K PRASANNAKUMARI F
172 86 KONIKARA PRABHAKARAN  
173 87 LATHA CHANDRAN F
174 88 MEERA NAIR F
175 89 N K AKBAR  
176 90 A K BALAN  
177 91 M CHANDRAN  
178 92 V C KARTHYAYANI F
179 93 P K SASI  
180 94 M HAMSA  
181 95 T K ACHUTHAN  
182 96 A.PRABHAKARAN  
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
183 97 S B RAJU  
184 98 N. UNNIKRISHNAN  
185 99 GEORGE.K.ANTONY  
186 100 KOOTAYI BASHEER  
187 101 V.SASIKUMAR  
188 102 V P SAKHARIA  
189 103 K.RAMDAS  
190 104 V P SOMASUNDARAM  
191 105 T P RAMAKRISHNAN  
192 106 V P KUNHIKRISHNAN  
193 107 T.DASAN  
194 108 P K MUKUNDAN  
195 109 P P PREMA F
196 110 K K MAMMU  
197 111 K. BHAGEERATHY F
198 112 P.NASAR  
199 113 V V BABY  
200 114 P V SAHADEVAN  
201 115 K P SAHADEVAN  
202 116 C.KRISHNAN  
203 117 K.MANOHARAN  
204 118 ARAKKAN BALAN  
205 119 M V JAYARAJAN  
206 120 K P RAJAN  
207 121 T P SREEDHARAN  
208 122 MARY JOB F
209 123 K JAYARAJAN  
210 124 T K RAJAN  
211 125 V P P MUSTHAFA  
212 126 MONYMOHANAN  
213 127 V P PRASANNAKUMARI F
214 128 NEDUVATHOOR SUNDERSAN  
215 129 P K SHAJAN  
216 130 MAMPATTA SREEDHARN  
217 131 G RAJAAMMA F
218 132 V S ANOOP  
219 133 N MOHAMMED  
220 134 V A MURUGAN  
221 135 K K HARIKUTTAN  
222 136 M MOHAN DAS  
223 137 T M JAMEELA F
224 138 K MOHANDAS  
225 139 M N MURALI  
226 140 K JAYAPRAKASH  
227 141 C K HARIKRISHNAN  
228 142 SURESH PALATHIL  
229 143 K M SURENDERAN  
230 144 C T ANIL  
231 145 K N KUTTAMANI  
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
232 146 BAIJU OMALUR  
233 147 P G DILEEP  
234 148 L MANJUNATH  
235 149 SURJEET KUMAR BOSE  
236 150 M K KANNAN  
237 151 SUNITHA KURIEN F
238 152 DHANYA ABID F
239 153 O S BINDU F
240 154 JOSE T ABRAHAM  
241 155 ZIAUDEEN A  
242 156 R GOPALAKRISHNAN  
243 157 DR PRADEEP  
244 158 P S MADHUSUDAHNAN  
       
 MADHYA PRADESH (GC-03)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
245 1 AT PADMANABHAN  
246 2 RAMVILAS GOSWAMI  
247 3 KISHORI VERMA  
 MAHARASHTA  (GC-11)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
248 1 NARSAYYA ADAM MASTER  
249 2 MH SHAIKH  
250 3 VIVEK MONTEIRO  
251 4 NALINITAI KALBURGI F
252 5 THOMBARE SITARAM  
253 6 KR RAGHU  
254 7 ANNA SAWANT  
255 8 UDHAV BHAVALKAR  
256 9 KAMBLE BHARMA  
257 10 MAHENDRA SINGH  
258 11 SHUBHA SHAMIM F
 ODISHA  (GC-06)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
259 1 JANARDAN PATI  
260 2 DUSHMANTA KUMAR DAS  
261 3 ULLASH SWAIN  
262 4 JAHANGIR ALI  
263 5 BIMAN MAITY  
264 6 PRAMOD KUMAR  
 PUNJAB  (GC-08)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
265 1 CHANDER SHEKHAR  
266 2 MOHAN SINGH RORHI  
267 3 JATINDER PAL SINGH  
268 4 HARJIT KAUR  
269 5 SUBHASH RANI  
270 6 MOHINDER KUMAR   
271 7 SUCHA SINGH AJNALA  
272 8 TARSEM JODHAN  
  RAJASTHAN (GC-04)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
273 1 V.S. RANA  
274 2 RAVINDRA SHUKLA  
275 3 HAZARI LAL SHARMA  
276 4 RK SWAMY  
  TAMIL NADU (GC-35)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
277 1 R SINGARAVELU  
278 2 V KUMAR  
279 3 K THIRUSELVAN  
280 4 K ARUMUGA NAYANAR  
281 5 A JANAKIRAMAN  
282 6 THANGAMOHAN  
283 7 E MUTHUKUMAR  
284 8 K C GOPIKUMAR  
285 9 T DAISY F
286 10 S RAJENDRAN  
287 11 MAHALAKSHMI F
288 12 R SINGARAN  
289 13 N HYED HELLEN F
290 14 C THIRUVETTAI  
291 15 S K MAHENDRAN  
292 16 R MOHAN  
293 17 V KARUPPIAHYAN  
294 18 M CHANDRAN  
295 19 R DEIVARAJ  
296 20 C JAYABAL  
297 21 K R GANESAN  
298 22 R RUSSEL  
299 23 R S SHENBEGAUM F
300 24 P N DEVA  
301 25 S KANNAN  
302 26 T JEYSHANKAR  
303 27 E PONMUDI  
304 28 M DHANALAKSHMI F
305 29 S KRISHNAMURTHY  
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
306 30 K RANGARAJ  
307 31 T GOVINDAN  
308 32 PRABHAKAR DEVADOSS  
309 33 A KRISHNAMURTHY  
310 34 M P RAMACHANDRAN  
311 35 C NAGARAJ  
 TELANGANA (GC-17)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
312 1 PALADUGU BHASKAR  
313 2 BHUPAL   
314 3 J. VENKATESH  
315 4 SALERAMA  
316 5 P. JAYALAKSHMI F
317 6 J. MALLIKARJUN  
318 7 KALAYANAM VENKATESHWARA RAO  
319 8 THUMMALA VEERA REDDY  
320 9 VANGURU RAMULU  
321 10 MANDHA NARSIMHA RAO  
322 11 V. SREENIVASA RAO  
323 12 RATNAKARAM KOTAMRAJ  
324 13 MUDUNURU PADMA SRI F
325 14 KARIKE RAJAIAH  
326 15 J. CHANDRA SHKAR  
327 16 R. TRIVENI F
328 17 K. ESHWAR RAO  
     TRIPURA (GC-04)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
329 1 SANKAR DATTA  
330 2 PANCHALI BHATTACHARYA F
331 3 SAMAR CHAKRABORTY  
332 4 NIRMAL ROY  
     UTTAR PRADESH (GC-02)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
333 1 PREMNATH RAI  
334 2 RAVI MISHRA  
     UTTRAKHAND (GC-01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
335 1 MP JHAKHMOLA  
WEST BENGAL (GC-78)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
336 1 KINKAR POSHAK  
337 2 SUKANTA KONAR  
338 3 BANSAGOPAL CHOWDHURY  
339 4 BISWARUP BANERJEE  
340 5 SAMIR SAHA  
341 6 ASIT MUKHERJEE  
342 7 JIAUL ALAM  
343 8 DEBANJAN CHAKRABORTY  
344 9 TARUN BHARADWAJ  
345 10 PRANAB DAS  
346 11 SUBRATA PONDA  
347 12 S.M. SADI  
348 13 NIKHIL MUKHERJEE  
349 14 MD. NIZAMUDDIN  
350 15 RATAN BAGCHI  
351 16 GARGI CHATTERJEE F
352 17 SAMAN PATHAK  
353 18 DIPAK DAS GUPTA  
354 19 RATNA DATTA  
355 20 INDRANI MUKHERJEE  
356 21 NEPAL DEV BHATTACHARYA  
357 22 JIBAN SAHA  
358 23 SOUMENDU MUKERJEE  
359 24 DIPANKAR CHAKRABORTY  
360 25 MATIUR RAHAMAN  
361 26 ANJAN CHATTERJEE  
362 27 G.K. SRIVASTAV  
363 28 SUPRIYO ROY  
364 29 MALOY SARKAR  
365 30 SUKHMOIT ORAON F
366 31 RAMPRASAD SENGUPTA  
367 32 KHOKAN MAJUMDAR  
368 33 DEB JYOTI SINHA  
369 34 KANCHAN MUKHERJEE  
370 35 AMAL BHOWMIK  
371 36 HARADHAN BANERJEE  
372 37 BHIM KUMAR  
373 38 TUSAR DEY  
374 39 JYOTIRUP BANERJEE  
375 40 PRANAB BISWAS  
376 41 MD. AZAD  
377 42 KRISHNA ROY CHATTERJEE F
378 43 SUSHIL KUMAR DOLUI  
379 44 RAM DAS  
380 45 PRANAB MAJUMDAR  
381 46 SOMNATH BHATTACHARYA  
382 47 ASIT SEN  
383 48 SUBHAJIT DASGUPTA  
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
384 49 SRIDIP ROY CHOWDHURY  
385 50 SIB SANKAR GHOSH  
386 51 JAHAR GHOSAL  
387 52 SWAPAN GUHA NEOGI  
388 53 GOUTAM GOSWAMI  
389 54 RABIN RAI  
390 55 TARIT BARAN TOPDAN  
391 56 SUNIL NATI  
392 57 ASHIM GOSHAL  
393 58 SHILA MONDAL  
394 59 MANISHA CHAKRABORTY  
395 60 MALINA GHOSH  
396 61 MITA GHOSH  
397 62 SIHARAN ACHARYA  
398 63 BELA PATRA F
399 64 ASADULLA GAYEN  
400 65 JITEN NANDI  
401 66 PIYUSH SARKAR  
402 67 ALOKESH DAS  
403 68 AVI BOSE  
404 69 ANIMESH MITRA  
405 70 PRADEEP CHAKRABORTY  
406 71 BASKAR CHATTERJEE  
407 72 MONORANJAN MONDAL  
408 73 DEBI PATHAK  
409 74 DIPAK MITRA  
410 75 SUMAHAN CHAKRABORTY  
411 76 ABHASH ROY CHOWDHURY  
412 77 VACANT FOR PORT  
413 78 VACANT FOR FSUI  
CENTRE (GC-12)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
414 1 RANAJANA NIRULA F
415 2 R LAKSHMAIAH  
416 3 NARENDRA RAO  
417 4 LALIT MISHRA  
418 5 SHYAMAL CHAKROBORTY  
419 6 DEBASHISH ROY  
420 7 NOGEN CHUTIA  
421 8 SHANTANU CHATTERJEE  
422 9 P TYAGI  
423 10 H S RAJPUT  
424 11 ANJU MAINI F
425 12 NISHIT CHOWDHURY  
Sunday, 09 February 2014 13:40

Working Committee

CENTRE OF INDIAN TRADE UNIONS (CITU)
WORKING COMMITTEE ELECTED BY THE 16th CONFERENCE OF CITU
23-27 January, Chennai, Tamilnadu

  ANDHRA PRADESH (WC-10)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
1 1 CH. NARSINGA RAO  
2 2 V. UMA MAESWARARAO  
3 3 P. AJAYA KUMAR  
4 4 K. SWARUPA RANI F
5 5 A.V. NAGESWARARAO  
6 6 K. DHANALAXMI F
7 7 K. UMA MAHESWARARAO  
8 8 K. SUBBARAVAMMA F
9 9 M. JAGGUNAIDU  
10 10 R.V. NARSIMHARAO  
       
  ASSAM (WC-02)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
11 1 ASHIT DUTTA  
12 2 VACANT  
       
  BIHAR (WC-01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
13 1 GANESH SHANKAR SINGH  
       
  DELHI (WC-01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
14 1 ANURAG SAXENA  
       
  HARYANA (WC-02)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
15 1 SUREKHA  F
16 2 JAI BHAGWAN  
       
  HIMACHAL PRADESH (WC-01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
17 1 PREM GAUTAM  
       
  JHARKHAND (WC-02)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
18 1 MITHILESH KUMAR SINGH  
19 2 PRAKASH VIPLAV  
       
  KARNATAKA (WC-05)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
20 1 KN UMESH  
21 2 VASHANTHACHARI  
22 3 SYED MUJEEB  
23 4 K. MAHANTESHA  
24 5 SUNANDA HS F
       
  KERALA (WC-45)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
25 1 M K KANNAN  
26 2 N PADMALOCHANAN  
27 3 K P SAHADEVAN  
28 4 A K BALAN  
29 5 T P RAMAKRISHNAN  
30 6 K J THOMAS  
31 7 M CHANDRAN  
32 8 K P MARY F
33 9 V SIVAN KUTTY  
34 10 KATTAKADA SASI  
35 11 NEDUVATHOOR SUNDARESAN  
36 12 P P CHITTARANJAN  
37 13 T K RAJAN  
38 14 C JAYAN BABU  
39 15 K N GOPINATH  
40 16 P P  PREMA F
41 17 U P JOSEPH  
42 18 C KRISHNAN  
43 19 S JAYAMOHAN  
44 20 K K RAMACHANDRAN  
45 21 P K MUKUNDAN  
46 22 C K MANISHANKAR  
47 23 M HAMSA  
48 24 P K SHAJAN  
49 25 P J AJAYAKUMAR  
50 26 V P ZACHARIA  
51 27 K S MOHANAN  
52 28 V SASIKUMAR  
53 29 B THULASEEDHARA KURUP  
54 30 P R MURALIDHARAN  
55 31 K JAYAPRAKASH  
56 32 P GANAKUMAR  
57 33 A V RUSSSEL  
58 34 K MANOHARAN  
59 35 K K PRASANNA KUMARI F
60 36 K MOHANDAS  
61 37 C K HARKRISHNAN  
62 38 K SUNILKUMAR  
63 39 ADV P SAJI  
64 40 MAMPATTA  SREEDHARAN  
65 41 V V BABY  
66 42 SUNITHA KURIEN F
67 43 DHANYA ABID F
68 44 DEEPA K RAJAN F
69 45 P G DILEEP  
       
       
       
  MADHYA PRADESH (WC- 01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
70 1 AT PADMANABHAN  
       
  MAHARASHTA  (WC- 03)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
71 1 NARSAYYA ADAM MASTER  
72 2 MH SHAIKH  
73 3 VIVEK MONTEIRO  
       
  ODISHA  (WC- 02)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
74 1 JANARDAN PATI  
75 2 DUSHMANTA KUMAR DAS  
       
  PUNJAB  (WC- 02)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
76 1 CHANDER SHEKHAR  
77 2 MOHAN SINGH RORHI  
       
   RAJASTHAN (WC- 01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
78 1 V.S. RANA  
       
   TAMIL NADU (WC- 10)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
79 1 R SINGARAVELU  
80 2 V KUMAR  
81 3 K THIRUSELVAN  
82 4 K ARUMUGA NAYANAR  
83 5 A JANAKIRAMAN  
84 6 THANGAMOHAN  
85 7 E MUTHUKUMAR  
86 8 K C GOPIKUMAR  
87 9 T DAISY F
88 10 S RAJENDRAN  
       
  TELANGANA (WC- 05)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
89 1 PALADUGU BHASKAR  
90 2 BHUPAL   
91 3 J. VENKATESH  
92 4 SALERAMA  
93 5 P. JAYALAKSHMI F
       
  TRIPURA (WC- 01)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
94 1 SANKAR DATTA  
       
       
  WEST BENGAL (WC- 22)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
95 1 KINKAR POSHAK  
96 2 SUKANTA KONAR  
97 3 BANSAGOPAL CHOWDHURY  
98 4 BISWARUP BANERJEE  
99 5 SAMIR SAHA  
100 6 ASIT MUKHERJEE  
101 7 JIAUL ALAM  
102 8 DEBANJAN CHAKRABORTY  
103 9 TARUN BHARADWAJ  
104 10 PRANAB DAS  
105 11 SUBRATA PONDA  
106 12 S.M. SADI  
107 13 NIKHIL MUKHERJEE  
108 14 MD. NIZAMUDDIN  
109 15 RATAN BAGCHI  
110 16 GARGI CHATTERJEE F
111 17 SAMAN PATHAK  
112 18 DIPAK DAS GUPTA  
113 19 RATNA DATTA F
114 20 INDRANI MUKHERJEE F
115 21 NEPAL DEV BHATTACHARYA  
116 22 JIBAN SAHA  
       
  CENTRE (WC- 08)
Sl. No. Sl. No. Names M/F
117 1 RANAJANA NIRULA F
118 2 R LAKSHMAIAH  
119 3 NARENDRA RAO  
120 4 LALIT MISHRA  
121 5 SHYAMAL CHAKROBORTY  
122 6 DEBASHISH ROY  
123 7 NOGEN CHUTIA  
124 8 SHANTANU CHATTERJEE  


Page 56 of 57